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Undergraduate Fellows

Group photo of USRP students.

Stanford undergraduate students seeking opportunities to do hands-on research, learn how to carry out experiments in the laboratory, and develop the skills to read and analyze scientific literature.  Learn more about the Undergraduate Summer Research Program!

Search Undergraduate fellows view the 2019 USRP brochure

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: Chemical Engineering
    Supported by: Dean of Research
    Mentor: Beth Pruitt, AssociateProfessor of Mechanical Engineering

    David Ayala-Lindeman, a rising senior, is working in the Pruitt Lab this summer, fabricating arrays of polystyrene microposts that will be used to study the forces of adherent cells. He is a big soccer fan who is excited to go to Brazil for the 2014 FIFA World Cup. He plans on co-terming in chemical engineering and then using his research experience to get a job in the nanofabrication and semiconductors industry.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    Development of Polystyrene Microposts for Traction Force Microscopy

    David Ayala-Lindeman1, Alexandre Ribeiro1, Beth Pruitt1
    [Department of Mechanical Engineering1, Stanford University]

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: Biology
    Supported by: anonymous donor
    Mentor: Yoon-Jae Cho, Assistant Professor of Neurology   

    Brianna is a rising junior. As a biology major, her interests lie in oncology and neuroscience. This summer in the Cho lab, she is investigating the effectiveness of optogenetic techniques in reducing tumor proliferation in medulloblastoma cells. In her free time, she enjoys watching Saturday morning cartoons, playing card games, and making music on her ukulele.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    Tumor Suppressive Effects of Optogenetic and Pharmacological Stimulation in Medulloblastoma Cells

    Brianna Balansay1, Yujie Tang1, Brian Nguyen1, Simone Schubert1, James M. Cook3, Sundari Rallapalli3, Frances Jensen2, Yoon-Jae Cho1
    [Department of Neurology1, Stanford University; Children's Hospital Boston2; University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee3]

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: Human Biology
    Supported by: Dean of Research and VPUE
    Mentor: Euan Ashley, Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Rachel Bent is a rising junior majoring in human biology with a concentration in disease and human health. She hopes to pursue a medical career and has particular interest in cardiology. This summer she is conducting research at the Stanford Center for Inherited Cardiovascular Disease in the laboratory of Dr. Euan Ashley. She is working on a project to detect electrocardiographic (ECG) differences between athletes and patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic heart condition. The hope is that this analysis will reveal ECG characteristics unique to patients with HCM and will influence policy in the screening of athletes for this disease.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    Detection of Electrocardiographic Differences Between Athletes and Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Rachel Bent1, Marco Perez1,2, Victor Froelicher2, Euan Ashley1,2
    [Stanford Center for Inherited Cardiovascular Disease1 and Department of Cardiovascular Medicine2, Stanford University]

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: Biology
    Supported by: anonymous donor
    Mentor: Matthew Scott, Professor of Developmental Biology, Genetics, and Bioengineering

    A soon-to-be junior, Sara Broski is continuing her research in Dr. Matthew Scott’s laboratory. Her work focuses on understanding regulation of gene transcription and how inappropriate gene expression can result in tumorigenesis. When not working in the lab, Sara spends her time swimming, reading, and discovering new music. She is a Bay Area native who is majoring in biology and plans to practice as a paramedic for several years before ultimately going to graduate school for a degree in the neurosciences.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    Interaction of Gli1 with Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors During Cerebellar Development

    Sara M. Broski1,2,3, James G. Purzner1,2,3, Eunice Y. Lee1,2,3, Alexander S. Brown1,2,3, Matthew P. Scott1,2,3
    [Departments of Developmental Biology1, Genetics 2, and Bioengineering3, Stanford University]

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: Human Biology
    Supported by: anonymous donor and Pitch and Catherine Johnson
    Mentor: Matthew Scott, Professor of Developmental Biology, Genetics, and Bioengineering

    Tally is a rising senior majoring in human biology with a concentration in genomics and cancer biology. She is currently conducting research on genetic regulation in development and disease in Dr. Matthew Scott’s lab. She is looking for upstream effector molecules of the sonic hedgehog pathway that may play a key role in the progression of many cancers, including medulloblastoma. By identifying target molecules, drugs can be made to inhibit these molecules and stop the mechanism the cancer uses to grow.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    Identifying Early Events of Hedgehog Signaling

    Tally Buckstaff1, Teresa Purzner2, Matthew Scott2
    [Departments of Human Biology1 and Developmental Biology2, Stanford University]

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: Bioengineering
    Supported by: anonymous donor
    Mentor: James Chang, Professor of Surgery (Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery) and Alesha Castillo, Assistant Professor of Surgery

    Robert Carrera is a junior majoring in bioengineering. This summer he is working in the Castillo lab at the Palo Alto VA, studying bone regeneration in response to mechanical loading and the role of certain genes in osteoblast recruitment, proliferation, and differentiation. The aim of this research is to develop novel treatments for bone breaks and fractures, particularly for elderly patients. Robert plans on pursuing either an MD, a PhD in bioengineering, or an MD/PhD. In his free time, Robert likes to play rugby.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    Mechanical Stimulation and Bone Healing

    Robert Carrera1, Alesha Castillo2
    [Departments of Bioengineering1 and Surgery - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery2, Stanford University]

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: Biology
    Supported by: Dean of Research
    Mentor: Calvin Kuo, Professor of Medicine (Hematology)

    George is a rising junior majoring in biology with a concentration in neuroscience. This summer in Calvin Kuo's lab, he is studying the effect of miR-126 deletion on tumor angiogenesis by using a Lewis lung carcinoma syngeneic mouse tumor model. In this approach, wild-type control and miR-126 knockout mice on a C57/BL6 background will be inoculated subcutaneously with LLC cells. Some of his other interests include writing for The Stanford Daily and swimming. He plans to pursue medical school after graduation.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    The Role of miR-126 in Lung Tumor Angiogenesis

    George Chen1, Cynthia Kosinski1, Calvin Kuo1
    [Department of Medicine1, Stanford University]

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: Biology
    Supported by: Dean of Research
    Mentor: Irv Weissman, Professor of Developmental Biology and Pathology

    Robin Cheng is a rising junior majoring in biology with a concentration in molecular & cell biology. This summer, he is working in the lab of professor Irv Weissman in the Institute for Stem Cell Research & Regenerative Medicine. He is investigating the expression of the cell surface protein CD90 on cancer stem cells and characterizing its potential as a therapeutic antibody target in murine and human forms of breast cancer. After college, he would like to pursue an MD/PhD degree to advance his studies of cancer and stem cell biology.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    Evaluation of CD90 as a Therapeutic Antibody Target on Cancer Stem Cells

    Robin Z. Cheng1, Stephen Willingham1, Irving L. Weissman1
    [Institute for Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine1 and Stanford University]

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: Biology
    Supported by: Dean of Research and VPUE
    Mentor: Fan Yang, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and of Bioengineering

    Jeffrey is currently doing his coterm in biology. His research in Dr. Fan Yang's lab focuses on genetically engineering stem cells non-virally for therapeutic angiogenesis. Specifically, he is transiently modifying adipose-derived stem cells to overexpress angiogenic growth factors and homing signals via poly (β-amino ester) nanoparticulate vectors in order to stimulate blood vessel growth in both in vitro and in vivo models. Jeffrey plans to attend medical school upon graduation.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    Engineering Adipose-Derived Stem Cells using Biodegradable Polymeric Nanoparticles to Overexpress HGF and CXCR4 for Therapeutic Angiogenesis

    Jeffrey Choi1, Lorenzo Deveza2,4, Sungwon Lim2, Fan Yang2,3
    [Departments of Biology1, Bioengineering2, and Orthopaedic Surgery3, and School of Medicine4, Stanford University]

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: Biomechanical Engineering
    Supported by: anonymous donor
    Mentor: Jason Dragoo, Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Kieran is a rising junior majoring in biomechanical engineering. His research in the Human Performance Lab is focused on testing the efficacy of a six week biomechanical intervention program designed for varsity athletes who are at high risk of ACL injury. The research involves the utilization of 3D motion analysis software to capture and analyze data. Upon graduation, he plans to pursue medical school. Kieran also competes on the varsity sailing team at Stanford during the academic year.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    Anterior Cruciate Ligament Modifiable Biomechanical Risk Factors

    Kieran Chung1, Rebecca Shultz2, Jason Dragoo2
    [Departments of Biomechanical Engineering1, and Orthopedic Surgery2, Stanford University]

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: Biology
    Supported by: Dean of Research
    Mentor: Bruce MacIver, Professor of Anesthesia

    Beza is a senior majoring in biology with a concentration in neurobiology. She is working in Dr. Bruce MacIver's neuropharmacology lab in the anesthesiology department. This summer she is exploring the effect of different energy supplements (i.e. glucose, pyruvate, and lactate) in Artificial Cerebrospinal Fluid (ACSF) on the energetics and synaptic activity of neurons in the hippocampus. Data will be gathered using in vitro electrophysiological recordings of rat hippocampi slices. Beza’s future plans include applying to medical school and traveling.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    Food for Thought: A Better Way to Feed Your Brain Slices

    Beza A. Dagne1, Melis K. Sunay1, James Nie1, and Bruce MacIver1
    [Neuropharmacology Lab1, Stanford University]

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: undeclared
    Supported by: Dean of Research
    Mentor: Mary Teruel, Assistant Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Nicole Dalal is a rising sophomore who intends to major in human biology. As a member of the Teruel lab this summer, she is researching various factors involved in the mechanisms of adipogenesis and insulin resistance, which is critical to a better understanding and treatment of obesity. Nicole is fascinated by the application of science and research in clinical settings to improve health outcomes. Apart from research, she enjoys playing and watching sports and spending time with family and friends. In the future, Nicole plans to attend medical school.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    Understanding the Functional Role of C/EBPβ in Insulin Resistant Adipocytes

    Nicole Dalal1, Asuka Ota2, Mary N. Teruel2
    [Departments of Human Biology1, and Chemical & Systems Biology2, Stanford University]

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: Chemical Engineering
    Supported by: Dean of Research and Pitch and Catherine Johnson
    Mentor: Elizabeth Sattely, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering

    Camil graduated in June 2013. She decided to stay in the Sattely Lab another summer to continue her project investigating how certain members of the human gut microbiota activate ingested glucosinolates—anticancer compounds found in commonly consumed vegetables like kale, broccoli, and other brassicas. This summer, she will implement the high-throughput screen developed during her undergraduate honors project to identify the bacterial genes responsible for this enzymatic activation. In November, Camil will begin her Fulbright research in the Philippines to engineer iron-fortified rice, prior to starting her PhD in chemical engineering at the University of Delaware the following fall.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    A Gut Microbe-Plant Interaction Generates Anticancer Compounds: Metabolism of Dietary Glucosinolates by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Implications for Human Health

    Camil A. C. Diaz1, Andrew P. Klein1, Elizabeth S. Sattely1
    [Department of Chemical Engineering1, Stanford University]

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: Biology
    Supported by: Dean of Research and Pitch and Catherine Johnson
    Mentor: Jill Helms, Professor of Surgery (Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery)

    Ubah Jimale Dimbil is a rising senior majoring in biology and minoring in Arabic. Ubah is currently conducting research at the Hagey Pediatric Regenerative Medicine facility where she is focusing on finding the rate limiting step of Wnt3a protein production in CHO-S cells. In general, Ubah is extremely excited about stem cell research and its future impacts in biology. She has also recently decided to take a year off to teach before applying to medical school.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    Rate Limiting Step of Wnt3a Secretion from CHO-S Cells

    Ubah Jimale Dimbil1, Girija Dhamdhere1, Jill Helms1
    [Department of Surgery1, Stanford University]

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: Biomedical Computation
    Supported by: Dean of Research and VPUE
    Mentor: Vijay Pande, Professor of Chemistry and of Structural Biology and of Computer Science

    Osama is a rising junior at Stanford with an intended major of biomedical computation. His research in the Pande lab aims to improve parameter estimation of the Karplus equation utilizing machine learning with large data sets from molecular dynamics simulations of small proteins. When he is not conducting research, Osama can be found playing basketball.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    Karplusplus: Improving the Karplus Relation

    Osama El-Gabalawy1, TJ Lane2, Kyle Beauchamp3, Vijay Pande2
    [Departments of Biology1, Chemistry2, and Biophysics3, Stanford University]

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: Human Biology
    Supported by: anonymous donor
    Mentor: Joseph Wu, Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) and of Radiology

    Gia is a rising senior majoring in human biology with a concentration in infectious dis-ease and literary medicine. As a member of the Wu Lab, she is currently studying the fates of induced pluripotent stem cells and exploring novel forms of cardiovascular disease modeling and cell therapy. In addition to regenerative medicine, her academic interests include the medical humanities and the subjective experience of disease through narrative forms. Post-graduation, Gia plans to work in a community health setting prior to attending medical school.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    Safety Parameters of Bone Marrow Derived Stem Cell Transplantation for Treatment of Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    Gia Garrett1,2, Elly Seo1,2, Andrew Lee1,2, Charles Chan1,2, Joseph Wu1,2
    [Departments of Radiology1 and Medicine2, Stanford University]

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: undeclared
    Supported by: Dean of Research and VPUE
    Mentor: Lawrence Steinman, Professor of Pediatrics and Neurology and Pediatrics

    Angad is a rising junior planning to major in computer science. This summer in Dr. Steinman’s lab, he is working with mice to investigate myeloid cell heterogeneity in autoimmune diseases. More specifically, he is working to investigate the subset of macrophages that exist in vivo. Up to this point, most work in this area has been done in vitro. He is very excited about the opportunity to work with Bio-X this summer and plans to pursue medical school upon graduation.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    Exploring Myeloid Cell Heterogeneity in Autoimmune Disease

    Angad Gogia1, Bahareh Ajami1, Matt Spitzer2, Garry Nolan2, Lawrence Steinman1
    [Departments of Neurology1 and Microbiology & Immunology2, Stanford University]

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: Chemistry
    Supported by: anonymous donor
    Mentor: Steven Boxer, Professor of Chemistry

    Oliver Hamto is a rising senior. His research in the Boxer lab focuses on a fluorescent protein that emits in the red zone of the visible spectrum: mCherry. The study aims to apply mCherry constructs to split protein methods previously developed in the same lab for green fluorescent proteins. In his spare time, he likes to get involved with the Pilipino-American community on- and off-campus.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    Cherry Picking: Proteolytic and Chaotropic Disassembly of Monomeric Red Fluorescent Proteins

    Oliver Hamto1, Luke Oltrogge1, Steven Boxer1
    [Department of Chemistry1, Stanford University]

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: Biology
    Supported by: Dean of Research
    Mentor: Gary Steinberg, Professor in Neurosurgery, Neurosciences, and Neurology

    Jimmy He, a biology major, is working in Dr. Steinberg’s lab. This summer, he will learn tissue culture techniques as well as how to design and run effective experiments. His goal is to elucidate the role of ZNF521, one of several genes uniquely overexpressed in the vasculature of Moyamoya disease patients, in possible smooth muscle cell proliferation. Apart from Bio-X, Jimmy is learning golf and playing trombone in the summer Stanford Symphony Orchestra.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    Elucidating the Role of ZNF521 on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation in Moyamoya Disease

    Jimmy He1, Lorelei Shoemaker1, Gary Steinberg1
    [Department of Neurosurgery1, Stanford University]

  • 2013 Undergraduate Summer Research Program Participant

    Home Department: Biomechanical Engineering
    Supported by: VPUE and Bio-X
    Mentor: Josef Parvizi, Associate Professor of Neurology & Neurosciences

    Michael is a rising junior. His research interests revolve around the development of new technologies for medical applications. This summer Michael is working on an EEG sonification device that can process brain signals into music and "sing" the melody of the brain using computer synthesized voices in real time, thus providing an intuitive and auditory method for distinguishing between brain states. Enabling patients to listen to their own brain signals in real time allows for research into a new, sonification-enhanced biofeedback therapy for epilepsy. After graduation, Michael is planning on attending medical school.

    Poster presented at the Stanford Bio-X Interdisciplinary Initiatives Symposium on August 26, 2013:

    The Brain in Performance: Understanding Brain Waves through Sound and Space

    Michael Iorga1, Juan-Pablo Caceres3, Chris Chafe3, Josef Parvizi2
    [Departments of Biology1 and Neurology3, Stanford University]

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